Our privacy policy

Keeping your details safe.

This privacy policy sets out how we use and protect any information that you give us when you use this website.

We want to ensure that your privacy is protected. Should we ask you to provide certain information by which you can be identified when using this website, then you can be assured that it will only be used in accordance with this privacy statement.

We may change this policy from time to time by updating this page. You should check this page from time to time to ensure that you are happy with any changes.

Using your personal data legitimately

This privacy policy sets out how we use and protect any information that you give us when using this website and interacting with The Career Psychologist. It reflects new UK/EU data protection laws taking effect on 25 May 2018.

We obtain information about you when you email us or use our website. For example, when you contact us with an enquiry, or if you register to receive our blogs and news updates. If you undergo coaching with us, we also collect information during the coaching process, which we need in order to coach you.
Your personal data will only ever be used in accordance with this privacy statement. If you have any questions about it, please email info@thecareerpsychologist.com

We may change this policy from time to time by updating this page, so please check it intermittently to ensure you are happy with any changes.

Who are we?

We are a network of expert psychologists which does not operate for profit (we charge only to cover our running costs and so each psychologist can earn a living).
The Career Psychologist is itself not a company, but a network of independent career psychologists operating under a single brand. The Career Psychologist core team is Rob Archer and Nimita Shah, who collaborate with the other psychologists in the network. When you sign up for coaching with The Career Psychologist, Nimita will discuss your requirements with you and then – with your agreement – refer you to the career psychologist best placed to help you. Each member of the network commits to treating your personal data in accordance with this privacy policy and with UK and EU data protection laws.

What information is collected, why, how and when?

When you email us or use the ‘Contact Us’ form on our website to make an enquiry, we collect your name, email address, phone number if you provide it, and a description of your situation. To determine the best career psychologist to help you, we may then email or call you to seek further information about your situation.

When you undergo coaching with one of our expert career psychologists, the data gathered during your enquiry is passed to that psychologist – you agree to this as part of the coaching contract before the coaching starts. In order to coach you well, that psychologist will also gather further information about you during the coaching, such as notes they make during your sessions or exercises that you complete. Before you agree to start the coaching, your career psychologist will explain what data they gather, why, how they keep it secure, and what they will do with it after the coaching ends. If you are not happy with any of this, you can decide not to undergo the coaching.

If you have registered on our website for blog posts and other updates from us, or you opt in to these via other means we provide, we gather your name and email address which we use to email you the blog and other updates that you requested. You can unsubscribe from these at any time via the ‘unsubscribe’ links which we include at the bottom of each email.

We will hold your personal information securely in our systems for as long as is necessary for the relevant activity or as long as is set out in any relevant contract you hold with us. When you use our website or make an enquiry, our lawful basis for processing your data is legitimate interests so we can provide the service you would expect. When you use our coaching services, our contract with you is the lawful basis. When we send you blog posts, our lawful basis is your consent, which you can withdraw at any time as explained above.

As is normal when using the internet, when you use our website, we collect your IP address so that our webserver can show you the pages you wish to see. We also sometimes use Google Analytics to see which of our web pages are accessed and when. (See the section on ‘Cookies’ below for more details). But we do not ourselves store any of this data, nor can we personally identify you from it.

Who has access to your information?

We will not sell or rent your information to third parties, or share it with third parties for marketing purposes.
We may transfer your personal information to a third party if we are under a duty to do so to comply with any legal obligation or to enforce or apply our terms of use or to protect the rights, property or safety of our team or our clients. However, in this case we will take steps with the aim of ensuring continued protection of your privacy rights.

How you can access & update your information

If you change email address, or any of the other information we hold is inaccurate or out of date, please email info@thecareerpsychologist.com and we will seek rapidly to correct it.

You have the right to ask for a copy of the information that we hold about you, and in some cases for your personal data to be deleted. To do this, please contact both info@thecareerpsychologist.com and, if applicable, the psychologist who coached you (using the email address with which they corresponded with you).

Security procedures we follow

We take steps to treat your personal data securely.

However, we transmit information normally over the internet, and this can never be guaranteed to be 100% secure. As a result, while we strive to protect your personal information, we cannot guarantee the security of any information you transmit to us, and you do so at your own risk. Once we receive your information, we make our best effort to ensure its security on our systems.

Use of cookies

A cookie is a small file which asks permission to be placed on your computer’s hard drive. Once you agree, the file is added and the cookie helps analyse web traffic or lets you know when you visit a particular site. Cookies allow web applications to respond to you as an individual. The web application can tailor its operations to your needs, likes and dislikes by gathering and remembering information about your preferences.

We use traffic log cookies to identify which pages are being used. This helps us analyse data about webpage traffic and improve our website in order to tailor it to customer needs. We only use this information for statistical analysis purposes and then the data is removed from the system.

Overall, cookies help us provide you with a better website by enabling us to monitor which pages you find useful and which you do not. A cookie in no way gives us access to your computer or any information about you, other than the data you choose to share with us.

You can choose to accept or decline cookies. Most web browsers automatically accept cookies, but you can usually modify your browser setting to decline cookies if you prefer. This may prevent you from taking full advantage of the website.

Links to other websites

Our website may contain links to other websites of interest. This privacy policy applies only to our website‚ so we encourage you to read the privacy statements on the other websites you visit. We cannot be responsible for the privacy policies and practices of other sites even if you access them using links from our website.

In addition, if you linked to our website from a third party site, we cannot be responsible for the privacy policies and practices of the owners and operators of that third party site and recommend that you check the policy of that third party site.

Transferring your information outside the EU

Some of our expert psychologists are based outside the European Union – currently Rachel Collis in Brisbane, Australia, and Rob Handleman in New York, USA. This can be a great advantage to any clients who themselves are based in these countries. However, we are required to flag that these places may have different data protection laws to the EU and the UK. Like all members of The Career Psychologist network, those psychologists based outside the EU will abide by this privacy notice and if you consider undergoing coaching with them, they will make clear as part of the contract how they will use and protect your personal data. If you proceed with the contract you are agreeing to this transfer and use of your personal data.

Review of this policy

We keep this Policy under regular review. This Policy was last updated in May 2018.

  • Executive Coaching, Getting Unstuck coaching

    Staying Afloat

    What to do when feeling emotionally “all at sea”

    When we get overwhelmed with distressing emotions or unwanted thoughts it’s a bit like being brought out to sea by a strong current into the middle of the ocean. If we don’t know what to do we can feel tired, frightened, exhausted and alone. Our mind might be telling us there’s no way back, our breathing can get faster and as we struggle to stay afloat by treading water or trying to swim against the current, it can feel exhausting and terrifying. Sometimes our mind might even tell us that drowning might be a good way to relieve our distress. One thing is for sure, the more we struggle the faster we will sink!

    To a poor swimmer, doing “nothing” in such a situation would be counter-intuitive, in fact they just wouldn’t think of it. But to an accomplished swimmer, lying flat on the water comes naturally and easily. This is how one person describes their experience of staying afloat:

    “I swim out and just lie on my back in the ocean, allowing ripples to pass under me. When larger ripples or waves surprise me I accept this, knowing that the moment will pass and the uncomfortableness I feel will not last forever. Sometimes, after I float for a while I look up and can see I’ve been carried away by the current and I know what to do. I don’t swim against it, instead I either let myself go with it until it brings me back to shore or I swim sideways instead, without tiring myself. While I lay back I can even notice the feeling of the sun on my face, the sound of the gulls, the smell of the sea, the sensation of buoyancy and the taste of salt on my lips as I allow myself to think about the things I am grateful for. Then, when I’m out of the current I will swim into shore and be with the people I care about. The worst that will happen is that I may be 100 metres further down the beach but I won’t have tired myself out and I won’t have drowned”.

     

    Sometimes, we can feel overwhelmed with distressing feelings, physical unease or unwanted, judgmental thoughts, particularly in quieter times or when feeling under stress. These thoughts are just like the ripples in the ocean; they never stop but they always move on past us. Some are small while others are larger waves, which hit us unexpectedly and can knock us off-kilter. Sometimes, life can even feel like we are caught up in an overwhelming current of emotion. This can occur in any life domain including work and careers, personal lives, relationships or individual general health and wellbeing. The good news is that ways to deal with life’s waves and emotional currents can be learned and practised, so they don’t have to overwhelm us. Indeed, just like we can learn to stay afloat in the ocean we can learn to stop struggling, lie back and wait for our unwanted thoughts and feelings to pass us by. For some people this might involve getting help from a psychologist, coach or therapist, for others it may be helpful to start with mindfulness exercises to help them to focus on our breathing and connecting with their five senses (what they can see, feel, smell, taste or hear), until they come safely back to shore.

     

    Mental health problems can arise for many of us in the workplace. The above metaphor was developed in collaboration with two clients who gave consent for this to be published to help others. Both individuals are highly successful business executives; one of whom suffered from work-related anxiety and panic attacks and another who suffered from chronic depression and at times could become submerged in suicidal thoughts. If you’re struggling with your mental health in your career or working life, you may benefit from having a quick chat with a career psychologist. A good starting point may be to have a look at The Career Psychologist website (https://www.thecareerpsychologist.com/)

  • Career Change, Career Development, Interview coaching

    Build your own resilience toolkit

    The human brain can be great at ignoring or forgetting what we have done well, and focusing on our mistakes, errors or ‘areas for development’.

    By building our own Resilience toolkit we can help to balance this out – bringing more of your skills in to view.

    How does it work?

    You begin by looking back through emails/texts/certificates etc and finding evidence of things you have done well.

    This could be a simple email from a colleague thanking you for your time or a good appraisal or even a piece of work that you are particularly proud of.

    You can either print these off and keep them in a physical resilience toolkit (why not start a folder or box?) OR if you prefer digital records, then go ahead and create a digital version.

    Once you’ve gone back through your past, it’s time to start working on the present and future.

    Now, you need to start noticing when you get further positive feedback or thank you’s and add these to your toolkit.  As well as this you should notice when you feel that you have done a good job and add this too.

    Over time your folder or box will be overflowing with wonderful things…..all about YOU.

    Now what?

    Now – when you are feeling a little overwhelmed, worthless or like you aren’t good enough….pull out that box.

    Inside you will find concrete proof from yourself and others that you ARE good at what you do.  That you ARE enough and that you ARE resilient.

    When life can become a little overwhelming, how many times have you been told to ‘keep your chin up’? The challenge when our ‘chin’ needs help is that we tend to ruminate on more negative aspects of our life. One way to use this resilience toolkit is to take the time to read it when you are feeling this way. It should help to boost some of those good mood hormones to help you move forward with purpose.

    It is also an incredibly useful tool for populating competency-based questions too!

     

    Added Bonus – Tips for Completion:

    I also find that a little mood boosting treat can be useful when building and reading through your toolkit.

    Try adding one of the following foods to your toolkit to give your brain an extra boost;

     

    • Dark chocolate is rich in compounds that may increase feel-good chemicals in your brain.
    • Coffee provides numerous compounds, including caffeine and chlorogenic acid, that may boost your mood.
    • Since up to 90% of your body’s serotonin is produced in your gut, a healthy gut may correspond to a good mood. Fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, kombucha, and kimchi, are rich in probiotics that support gut health.
    • Bananas are a great source of natural sugar, vitamin B6, and prebiotic fibre, which work together to keep your blood sugar levels and mood stable.