Why choose us?

Professional coaching that gets results

The Career Psychologist is a team of expert applied psychologists who work with individuals and organisations to help transform careers.  There are five main reasons to work with us:

1. Expertise

We are fully trained applied psychologists specialising in careers.  This means we understand what actually works to help people build more fulfilling careers.

Of course many people claim to be experts, but our training helps us distinguish what really matters in transforming careers from what’s just noise.

Why does expertise matter in coaching?

2. Professionalism

All our psychologists are regulated by The British Psychological Society (or equivalent), ensuring the highest standards of professional and ethical conduct.

In addition, we are committed to our own continuous professional development and are in regular supervision – essential elements for any elite coach.

Why does professionalism matter in coaching?

3. Psychology

Psychology is about understanding human behaviour, so we focus on what may be going on at a deeper level that may be holding you back.

We are also pioneering the so-called ‘third wave’ of psychology within our practice. Overwhelming evidence shows the effectiveness of this approach, and we have integrated this into all of our services.

Why does psychology matter in coaching?

4. Experience

We speak from decades of experience of the ‘real’ world of work. All of us have:

  • made our own career change;
  • portfolio careers now and previous careers ranging from management consulting, retail and small business, banking, medicine and the civil service;
  • thousands of hours of coaching experience helping people to transform their careers.

Why does experience matter in coaching?

5. Values

We are in business to live our values. This means we will use our expertise to help you, challenging you where necessary; but we will act like compassionate human beings in the process.

Why do values matter in coaching?

 

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  • Career Change, Developing Coaches - ACT Training, Getting Unstuck coaching

    Are Your ‘Labels’ Sabotaging Your Career Change?

    by Dr Fiona Day

     Suzanne was working for an NHS (UK National Health Service) organisation which was being dissolved following a reorganisation. As a qualified physiotherapist she really struggled with the idea of being transferred away from the NHS and into an arms-length body, and she couldn’t see a way forwards for herself. She identified very strongly with the label ‘NHS staff’ – this was, she felt, at the very core of her professional identify.

    With no easy way for her to remain employed within the NHS, Suzanne was rapidly becoming stuck. The label ‘NHS staff’, which had given her so much drive and determination for the last 20 years, was now becoming a barrier to her ability to move forwards in the face of the reorganisation.

    What can we learn from Suzanne’s difficult experience? We all use labels about ourselves as a form of sense making in the world, these are like mental short cuts which may represent a much larger pattern of behaviours, roles, standards and values, as well as job titles.

    Sometimes labels are really helpful, for example ‘I want to drive more carefully now that I am a parent’; ‘my partner is ill and I want to be a good partner and support them to get better’; ‘as a professional teacher, I make sure that I attend my annual update training to keep my skills up’.

    But what happens when labels start to limit us in our thinking and limit our choices? This is particularly true when we are considering a change in career direction, so it is important to be aware of how the labels we habitually use to make sense of our world and our working lives can help or hinder us.

    Try these 5 steps

    You might like to take a moment to ask yourself whether your labels are still serving you well, by following these steps:

    1. Notice the labels you use about yourself – spend ten minutes writing down all the roles you identify with, and all the labels that you use, perhaps specifically focusing on those in a work related context.
    2. Be kind to yourself –it might feel a bit overwhelming to see them all written down, so take a moment to acknowledge that you are doing your best with all these different roles and labels, and that it is normal to find it difficult to balance them all.
    3. Go through each label one by one – asking yourself, ‘does this label still serve me?’. If it is helpful to continue to hold on to that label, perhaps because it is really important to help you to move your career in the direction you want it to go, then do hold on to it and use it as part of your compass of what you want your life and career to stand for.
    4. If you find that holding tightly onto that label is actually taking you away from what matters most to you, then be open to the suggestion that it may no longer be serving you well. It may be really scary to even begin to think of letting go of it even a little, so notice any thoughts or feelings of discomfort which arise at the thought of holding this label a little looser, and be willing to imagine that in the future this label may no longer be as important to you as it is at the moment.
    5. Check in with these labels over the years, and make sure they are still bringing you closer to greater meaning, purpose and satisfaction in your working life.

    Suzanne learned through coaching that the label she called ‘NHS staff’ was actually a mental short cut that she used to mean ‘making a difference and helping people in need’. With this greater insight and flexibility, she was able to make the right decision for herself in her difficult situation, and is now flourishing in her new career.

  • Career Change, Developing Coaches - ACT Training

    The Career Change Recovery Recipe

    by Ross McIntosh

    Rob’s post about the importance of energy management in career transition resonated with me because since I started my career change process over four years ago I’ve come to recognise the importance of recovery in my own life.

    So in this post I wanted to look at what the research says about psychological recovery, particularly through demanding career transitions.