Why choose us?

We're here to answer all your questions

If your question isn’t listed here, drop us a line and we’ll get back to you right away.

 

  • Who do you work with?

    A wide variety of private individuals and organisations.  We’ve worked with 100s of people from all walks of life, employed, not employed, entrepreneurs, graduates, mid-career changers and senior leaders.  Our organisational clients range from professional services, banking and finance, oil and gas, construction and FMCG to elite athletes.

  • Why would I need a psychologist?

    Don’t worry.  We won’t ask you to sit on a couch and tell us about your difficult childhood.

    Psychology is the science of human behaviour.  Psychologists can therefore offer new and different perspectives on how and why we get stuck.  This helps our clients understand what’s holding them back.

    Getting unstuck and finding more effective and meaningful work can be a long and complex journey.  Along the way there can be many challenges – practical and psychological.  We can help you deal with both.

    If you like the sound of this, get in touch.

  • How are you different from other coaches?

    Read about the 5 reasons to choose The Career Psychologist here.

    If you like the sound of us, get in touch to set up an informal chat.

  • How long does the career change process take?

    It depends.

    In general, our career change plans are designed to help you think differently about yourself and your career.  This takes time and effort.  We would estimate that on average each step of the 5 step career change process takes 3-4 weeks.  Our aim is to help clients feel that they truly did all the ‘due diligence’ they could possibly have made on their career decision.  In some cases, this can be very rapid.  Even a one off session can do the trick.  But we have also had clients commit to a 12 month process, which allows a slow and planned transition.

    The average is something like 3-4 months.

    If you’d like to chat further, get in touch.

  • Will I inevitably change career / job after your process?

    No.

    Many people do, but the objective is to make the best possible decision. In some cases (perhaps 30% of our clients) they choose to stay where they are.  For now.  But in general, these people make a clear plan for the future (by working on a clear transition plan) and / or they take some concrete steps to improving their job right now.  This is called job crafting.

    Career paralysis, or being ‘headstuck’, is a kind of mental limbo, a non-decision. That’s very different from consciously deciding to stay in your current work on your own terms.  Ultimately the Getting Unstuck process is not about leaving your current job, but making a conscious decision about the future.

    Get in touch if you’d like to discuss this further.

  • Can you help me move from 9-5 work to something more flexible?

    Yes, if that’s what’s right for you.

    In the Getting Unstuck process there is a specific section on generating options.  At this stage we encourage people to imagine what different combinations of jobs or projects might look like (for example, 2 days per week on an exciting freelance project, 2 days per week doing work to pay the bills and 1 day per week childcare).

    Or we explore transition moves, for example cutting down to 4 days in your current job and creating 1 day per week to work on your new business or freelance idea.

    All options are systematically evaluated and in the final step, a clear plan created to help you move forward with clarity and purpose.

    Get in touch if you want to discuss how the Getting Unstuck process could help you.

  • Do you use psychometric tests?

    Yes, where it helps – but we use them cautiously. Personality cannot capture your whole essence – you’re not a ‘type’, you’re a human.   Second, personality is contextual, not absolute: a strength in one context is a weakness in another.

    And we don’t believe in ‘matching’ people to an ideal job.  Job markets are far too complex and fast-moving. They’re based on backward-looking data, and can only cope with the major career types. Because of this, they can’t recommend new careers, nor less well-known careers or portfolio careers.  Humans are even more complex.  It’s easy to find introverted sales people and extravert librarians.   And psychometric tests have a tendency to reinforce someone’s rigid view of themselves, when what is needed is reinvention.

    So unless used wisely, psychometric tests are just as likely to keep you trapped in old ways of thinking as to open new avenues.

  • What’s the first step?

    If you feel we might help transform your career, it’s usually best to meet or speak with one of our career psychologists informally about your situation.

    If after that we both think we could work together, we’ll make a proposal (i.e. number of sessions, cost, objectives and outcomes) based around your specific requirements.

    So to take the first step, just get in touch.

  • What are your prices?

    Individuals:

    Our aim is to make the very best career coaching and psychology available at the most competitive prices.  Prices continue to vary for individual career services between psychologists, location, number of sessions booked and availability.

    We offer a free introductory session  to assess what kind of career services you need after which you will receive a detailed proposal with cost information attached.  Get in contact here to book your introductory session.

    Organisations:

    For all corporate coaching services prices are available on request – please contact us.

  • Do you work with companies and other organisations?

    Yes!

    We offer both Executive Coaching  and tailored training programmes for organisations.  Our clients include Astra Zeneca, Boston Consulting Group, Bank of America, Danske Bank, Laing O’Rourke, London Airports, HMRC, the UAE Government, Thames Water and UK Power Networks.  We also work with the third sector, offering coaching and workshops at discounted prices.

    For more detail on our services go here.

    To discuss any of our corporate services and prices please contact us.

  • Career Change, Developing Coaches - ACT Training, Getting Unstuck coaching

    Are Your ‘Labels’ Sabotaging Your Career Change?

    by Dr Fiona Day

     Suzanne was working for an NHS (UK National Health Service) organisation which was being dissolved following a reorganisation. As a qualified physiotherapist she really struggled with the idea of being transferred away from the NHS and into an arms-length body, and she couldn’t see a way forwards for herself. She identified very strongly with the label ‘NHS staff’ – this was, she felt, at the very core of her professional identify.

    With no easy way for her to remain employed within the NHS, Suzanne was rapidly becoming stuck. The label ‘NHS staff’, which had given her so much drive and determination for the last 20 years, was now becoming a barrier to her ability to move forwards in the face of the reorganisation.

    What can we learn from Suzanne’s difficult experience? We all use labels about ourselves as a form of sense making in the world, these are like mental short cuts which may represent a much larger pattern of behaviours, roles, standards and values, as well as job titles.

    Sometimes labels are really helpful, for example ‘I want to drive more carefully now that I am a parent’; ‘my partner is ill and I want to be a good partner and support them to get better’; ‘as a professional teacher, I make sure that I attend my annual update training to keep my skills up’.

    But what happens when labels start to limit us in our thinking and limit our choices? This is particularly true when we are considering a change in career direction, so it is important to be aware of how the labels we habitually use to make sense of our world and our working lives can help or hinder us.

    Try these 5 steps

    You might like to take a moment to ask yourself whether your labels are still serving you well, by following these steps:

    1. Notice the labels you use about yourself – spend ten minutes writing down all the roles you identify with, and all the labels that you use, perhaps specifically focusing on those in a work related context.
    2. Be kind to yourself –it might feel a bit overwhelming to see them all written down, so take a moment to acknowledge that you are doing your best with all these different roles and labels, and that it is normal to find it difficult to balance them all.
    3. Go through each label one by one – asking yourself, ‘does this label still serve me?’. If it is helpful to continue to hold on to that label, perhaps because it is really important to help you to move your career in the direction you want it to go, then do hold on to it and use it as part of your compass of what you want your life and career to stand for.
    4. If you find that holding tightly onto that label is actually taking you away from what matters most to you, then be open to the suggestion that it may no longer be serving you well. It may be really scary to even begin to think of letting go of it even a little, so notice any thoughts or feelings of discomfort which arise at the thought of holding this label a little looser, and be willing to imagine that in the future this label may no longer be as important to you as it is at the moment.
    5. Check in with these labels over the years, and make sure they are still bringing you closer to greater meaning, purpose and satisfaction in your working life.

    Suzanne learned through coaching that the label she called ‘NHS staff’ was actually a mental short cut that she used to mean ‘making a difference and helping people in need’. With this greater insight and flexibility, she was able to make the right decision for herself in her difficult situation, and is now flourishing in her new career.

  • Career Change, Developing Coaches - ACT Training

    The Career Change Recovery Recipe

    by Ross McIntosh

    Rob’s post about the importance of energy management in career transition resonated with me because since I started my career change process over four years ago I’ve come to recognise the importance of recovery in my own life.

    So in this post I wanted to look at what the research says about psychological recovery, particularly through demanding career transitions.